Heartbreak

Dustin Welch, Super Rooster Music (SESAC); Kevin Welch, Monkey Head Songs (SESAC); Claudia Scott, Family Style Publishing (SESAC)

You don’t look like you gonna be a problem
But somehow I know you still will be
Yea, I got all the answers if you want em
But nobody ever listened to me
I’ll go ahead and lay it down for you piece by piece
If you promise me that you’ll be good
I got a half a mind to leave you right here right now
And the truth is that I probably should

Pre CHO:
Oh but one of these days the time will come
When you find out love is real
Oh and nothing else’ll matter, no nothing at all
And all time will seem to stand still

CHO:
And then you’ll know what heartbreak will make you do
Yea, you will know what heartbreak will make you do

You got yourself in a bad situation
And I can see how this is gonna go down
Yea, you can take that one-way street to nowhere
Or get your ass outta this town
Oh, I know you’d like to think you got it all figured out
Cause you can drive about any man wild
You keep telling yourself you got it under control
But to me your just a long lost child

Repeat Pre-CHO
Repeat CHO (2x)

Dustin Welch: resonator guitar, vocals; Drew Smith: acoustic guitar, vocals; Kyle Ellison: electric guitar; Trisha Keefer: violin; Joe Beckham: electric bass; Joe Humel: drums; Dan Dyer: vocals; Carrie Elkin: vocal

My friend Skylar Wilson came over to pick me up one day to go play frisbee in the park, and I was working on this weird narrative style that I’d never tried in a song. It was totally a one sided conversation, very simple in language, but kinda complex to the ear. So I showed him this thing and then went, “So I want one line in the chorus I can repeat, that’s real basic but would be something profound to the person the main character is talking to. Something like, ‘And then you’ll know what heartbreak will make you do.’ ” It just fell out of my mouth like that and Skylar looked at me and said, “Or something exactly that, there it is. C’mon, can we go play frisbee now?” So after a couple weeks of not getting anywhere further past the chorus, I brought the thing over to my dad’s and showed it to his partner at the time, the fabulous Norwegian recording artist Claudia Scott. It made me look at the characters differently because all of a sudden it was about an older, more experienced woman sitting down this young, reckless girl telling her she needed to get her act straight. Every once in a while, we’d get stuck on a line, and my dad would stick his head in and suggest something, and the three of us finally polished the thing off as we were making dinner and setting the table.